Online Shop Fulfills Mission of Mennonite Women USA

Mennonite Women USA announces the newly launched online shop added to their website in late June 2015. It was created and developed in response to the needs and desires expressed by their supporters. Instead of having to call the office or send a letter indicating interest for particular materials, the Mennonite Women USA shop has all of their resources and materials available at the touch of a button.

The store is fully functional and responds to customers shopping from their desktop, laptop, tablet or smart phone. Now you can purchase as many copies of the latest Bible Study Guide Spark: Igniting Your God-Given Creativity right online for your groups or Sunday School classes.

With the launch of this new digital store Mennonite Women USA is offering bundle pricing for Sister Care materials, too. The discount encourages visitors to purchase their desired materials in a bundle to save money. One such offer brings a 20% savings over purchasing items individually. Continue reading

Postcard & a Prayer :: July Email Newsletter

Enjoy July e-news from Mennonite Women USA!

It is an easy way to get all the latest information, reflections and images that cover all our national and international happenings from our Sister Care seminars to our upcoming Timbrel coverage and giving tree. We also include a pertinent prayer, excerpts from women in the greater church and content relevant to Mennonite women everywhere.

Sign-up today, stay connected each month!

MW USA July Email 2015

Postcard & a Prayer :: June Email Newsletter

Enjoy June e-news from Mennonite Women USA!

It is an easy way to get all the latest information, reflections and images that cover all our national and international happenings from our Sister Care seminars to our upcoming Timbrel coverage and giving tree. We also include a pertinent prayer, excerpts from women in the greater church and content relevant to Mennonite women everywhere.

Sign-up today, stay connected each month!

MW USA June Email 2015

 

Finding God’s Laughter Through Clowning with Clown Medics :: Timbrel Summer 2015 :: Humor and the Playfulness of God

This is the Spanish version of an article originally published in English in the Summer 2015 Timbrel magazine. Subscribe to Timbrel today!

La historia comenzó por el año 2005, en la ciudad de Buenos Aires cuándo nació nuestro segundo hijo Bernabé, quién llegó a nuestras vidas con muchas complicaciones (prematuro, con muy bajo peso 1,200 Kg, síndrome de Down). Tuvo que estar en terapia intensiva neonatal como por 3 largos meses. En ese tiempo tuve mi primer encuentro con Payamédicos y pensé que era un lindo obrar de Dios, colorido, con humor y amor. 

Volvimos al Chaco con Bernabé en mejores condiciones de salud, pero el ministerio de visitar comunidades indígenas junto a mi compañero Esteban y nuestra hija Paloma, ya no iba a poder seguir de la misma forma. Berni necesitaba cuidados especiales de salud. Oramos con Esteban y un día Dios trajo a mi memoria la película de Pach Adams y sentí como una confirmación en mi corazón que era por ahí el camino a transitar.  Continue reading

Lici Roth and the Humor and Playfulness of God :: Summer 2015 Timbrel

by Lici Roth. Alicia (“Lici”) Roth is a native of Peru. After 15 years living in different parts of the US, she now enjoys life in small town Kansas. Lici has a degree in economics and experience working in health promotion in marginalized and migrant populations. Now, she’s on the journey of radical homemaking. She enjoys gardening, preserving, biking and doing occasional medical interpreting.

“Let her do whatever she wants to you,” said the ten-year old to her sister one Sunday morning when they showed up on our doorstep before church.

I had asked if I could braid her little sister’s hair.

“Why?” I asked

The older, “wiser” sister answered, “Because it’s you, and we trust you.”

It was true, they did, even the little one who only three months ago, when she got reunited with her older siblings, wouldn’t even shake my hand. Continue reading

Sue Conrad Howes on the Humor and the Playfulness of God :: Timbrel Summer 2015

by Sue Conrad Howes. Sue is an ordained Mennonite pastor and an aspiring comedian.  She is a graduate of Goshen College and holds an M.A. in Speech Communication from Penn State University and an M.Div. from Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary. She and her husband, Michael, also a pastor, live in Lancaster, PA and strive to fill their home with friends, exciting theological discussion, and lots of laughter.

At my seminary, there was a table outside of the library that had old books for sale. One day, I walked by and was taken back because of something on the table. Along with the normal, old, musty, theological books was a sketch of Jesus. I stood and stared at the sketch for a long time, mesmerized, drawn into the magnetism of Jesus expressed in this artwork. Eventually, I saw the 25 cent price tag on the art piece. Joyfully, I put a quarter in the self-serve payment box and put Jesus in my backpack.

Continue reading

MW USA History Project Update :: by Anita Hooley Yoder

by Anita Hooley Yoder

Let’s start with some numbers. Since I began this project last September, I have sorted through 29 binders and folders of material from Mennonite Women USA’s previous co-directors. I have read (or at least skimmed) nine books and 15 scholarly articles. I have spent 43 hours in archives and historical libraries and surveyed 40 years of Voice, Window to Mission, and Timbrel magazines. I learned that “two cents a prayer” became a $95,717 Missionary Pension Fund, that over 200 families served by Mennonite Disaster Service have received quilted wall hangings, and that the International Women’s Fund has supported the studies of 86 different women.

But this project is not really about numbers. It’s about people. Continue reading

Marian Sauder Egli Responds to Timbrel’s Food Justice Issue

Editor’s Note: There have been so many positive responses toTimbrel’s latest issue centered on diverse perspective on food justice. The following email was sent directly to me by Marian Sauder Egli. She gave permission to have her perspective posted on the Mennonite Women Voices blog.

“I enjoyed every article in the Timbrel spring issue.

I find that refrigeration is an issue in understanding “Food Justice.”  For a couple years I shared a church-owned apartment in Harlem, NYC with a friend. We chose to eat and cook separately since we were seldom there at the same time and had differing food choices.

The refrigerator met apartment code standards but was smaller than anywhere I had lived up to that time.  We couldn’t buy in bulk or make a large kettle of soup to then divide into smaller portions and freeze due to space.  Even while having a clean kitchen, there is an on-going battle with roaches when living in a 5 story walk-up apartment building.  It was better to store dry foods in the refrigerator. Continue reading

Postcard & a Prayer :: April Email Newsletter

Enjoy April e-news from Mennonite Women USA!

It is an easy way to get all the latest information, reflections and images that cover all our national and international happenings from our Sister Care seminars to our upcoming Timbrel coverage and giving tree. We also include a pertinent prayer, excerpts from women in the greater church and content relevant to Mennonite women everywhere.

Sign-up today, stay connected each month!

MW USA April Email 2015

Danile Martens on Food Justice :: Timbrel Spring 2015

20150314_140422Danile Martens lives and works in Mishawaka, Indiana.  She is married to John Martens.   She spent 4 years with her family in Cambodia with MCC working in provincial health services.  She is an active member of Kern Road Mennonite Church.  For fascinating reading on sustainable farming practice and theology of creation care she recommends the work of Gene Logsden,  Joel Salatin, and Ellen Davis.

It is winter and a pristine white snowfall flocks on branches, and gathers in swales, covering the pasture in white under a brilliant blue sky.  Soon spring will bring a green flush of grasses and clover, and the calves and their old dams will kick up their heels in anticipation and delight as they move to new pasture.  For now I enjoy the quiet of the morning, watching the dance of cardinals, finches, sparrows and juncoes around  the feeder.  Winter’s comparative leisure contrasts to the months of the growing season, May to October, when work lasts until dark most days. I have learned to accept the long spring and summer working days, at the end of which we have time only to eat, clean up, and fall into bed. We do not live by the clock, but by the rhythm of the seasons.  I find order and beauty in working with the cycles of nature but it is out of step with modern life.

Continue reading