Celebrating: Mother Mary

Mother Mary has always been one of my favorite biblical characters. As a teen mother myself, I think about the excitement of a young girl about to bring a baby into the world – it’s an exhilarating feeling. Your young mind cannot fully grasp the magnitude of what you are about to embark on; yet you are buzzing with anticipation. I remember thinking I was going to get the chance to be a great mother; unlike my own personal experience with my parents. I was going to be attentive, loving, and show my baby how great and special he would become. The problem with teen minds, is that we have not lived long enough yet to fully understand that bringing a child into this world would cost us so much more than time and love.

Mary was not only young and unwed, but also as a virgin must have experienced a multitude of emotions. She had not prepared her mind for a child; it was thrust upon her. So, like most teen mothers, the mixture of unbelief and fear also share the space with excitement. I am sure once Mary fully grasped her reality she, too, was excited about this special child growing in her body. Yet, like most young mothers, I am sure she had no clue of the enormous about of pressure this child would place on her life.

Mary’s child, like many teen mother’s children, find themselves in social situations beyond their control. The Christ child would be despised and rejected by the world around him. He would be treated unfairly, beaten, and imprisoned. He would be loved and honored in one breath and turned against in another. He would offer hope to some and spark fear in others. I am sure many teen mothers can look back over their own child’s life and see many of these same patterns – I know I can. Maybe that is why the Mother Mary is such an important biblical character for me. I know the joy and pain that comes with raising a child in a world that loves them one day and hates them the next.

Mothers have a place in this world like no other. The ability to produce life and the responsibility of nurturing that life is all consuming. As we celebrate the Christ child this season, let’s not forget the vessel that made it possible. To the Mother Mary and all the women who have accepted the role of mother to a child, may God bless you this season with Peace, Hope and Joy.

2 thoughts on “Celebrating: Mother Mary

  1. Pat Plude on said:

    Thank you Cyneatha, for another thoughtful, and thought provoking post. Your words brought to mind a poem by Kaitlyn Hardy Shetler that came to me just this week. Perhaps your readers will be as moved (and motivated) by this poem as I am.

    sometimes I wonder
    if Mary breastfed Jesus.
    if she cried out when he bit her
    or if she sobbed when he would not latch.

    and sometimes I wonder
    if this is all too vulgar
    to ask in a church
    full of men
    without milk stains on their shirts
    or coconut oil on their breasts
    preaching from pulpits off limits to the Mother of God.

    but then i think of feeding Jesus,
    birthing Jesus,
    the expulsion of blood
    and smell of sweat,
    the salt of a mother’s tears
    onto the soft head of the Salt of the Earth,
    feeling lonely
    and tired
    hungry
    annoyed
    overwhelmed
    loving

    and i think,
    if the vulgarity of birth is not
    honestly preached
    by men who carry power but not burden,
    who carry privilege but not labor,
    who carry authority but not submission,
    then it should not be preached at all.

    because the real scandal of the Birth of God
    lies in the cracked nipples of a
    14 year old
    and not in the sermons of ministers
    who say women
    are too delicate
    to lead.

    by Kaitlyn Hardy Shetler

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